New

26,000-Year-Old Child Footprints Found Alongside Paw Prints Reveal Oldest Evidence of Human-Canine Relationship

26,000-Year-Old Child Footprints Found Alongside Paw Prints Reveal Oldest Evidence of Human-Canine Relationship


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

There is little doubt that humans and dogs are naturally inclined to be best friends. But when and how did this dynamic duo first emerge? Conventional wisdom holds that agrarian man domesticated scavenger canines about 15,000 years ago. However, recent archaeological discoveries and DNA analyses show that not only is our friendship closer to 30,000 years old (possibly 40,000 years) but also that man did not master and breed wolves into companionable dogs. Rather, our relationship was built on mutual benefits and respect. This new reality has been made strikingly clear by the discovery of a set of footprints indicating a small child walked alongside a large wolf some 26,000 years ago.

‘Neolithic man and wolf-dog.’ Source: Newton’s Apple

Finding the Prints

The Chauvet Cave in France is renowned as the site of some of the world’s oldest paintings. Over 400 images of animals were created around 32,000 years ago. Yet it is another discovery that has gripped the imagination of canine enthusiasts. In the back of the cave, one can see the ancient footsteps of a small child walking alongside a wolf. Stretching over 150 feet (45.72 meters), the prints were made in soft clay, hardened, and were left undisturbed for thousands of years.

Human and canine prints found in Chauvet Cave. ( M.A. Garcia )

The human prints are of a barefooted child aged eight to ten years old and standing about 4.5 feet (1.4 meters) tall. The child was walking, not running, although at one point it appears that he or she slipped a little in the soft clay. Researchers know that the child carried a torch because there is evidence of him/her stopping at one point to clean the torch, leaving behind a stain of charcoal.

It is amazing to think of a Paleolithic kid exploring this ancient cave, examining the paintings and bear skulls that were placed reverently at the back of the cave. Even more amazing is that accompanying (not stalking) the child’s footprints are the paw prints of a wolf (or possibly a large dog). This timeless image of a child and dog shatters the notion that dogs were only domesticated 15,000 years ago. More importantly, the new time period radically alters the answer to how dogs became man’s best friend.

  • Researcher Presents Evidence for Cherished Role of Prehistoric Dogs in the Siberian Arctic
  • A Loyal Companion and Much More: Dogs in Ancient China
  • New Study Suggests that Man and Dog Have Been Close Friends for 33,000 Years

Old and New Theories

The now-outdated theory claims that at the end of the last ice age, wolves came skulking around human farms to feed off the garbage. In order to gain better access, the wolf had to approach in a humble and docile fashion. This habit was passed down among wolves creating a ‘juvenilized wolf’ at which point “humans took charge of its evolution through selective breeding, choosing those with desired traits and culling those who came up short” (Derr, 2011). This theory was widely believed until recent archaeological finds and more advanced DNA testing.

The new theory argues that humans and dogs evolved together. “We chose them, to be sure, but they chose us too, and our shared characteristics may well account for our seemingly unshakable mutual intimacy” (Derr, 2011). This relationship was not based on subservience but rather on a mutual respect for the different talents of each species.

A recreation of a Jōmon hunt with dogs. (Niigata Prefectural Museum of History/ Dogs For People )

The most important tenet that the new theory establishes is that wolves did not first interact with settled, agrarian humans. Instead, the 30,000-year date means that they would have first encountered roaming bands of hunter-gather humans. Over time, the two would have started cooperating because of “the similar social structure and size of wolf packs and early human clans [and] the compatibility of their hunting objectives and range” (Lange, 2002). In addition, the ability of each to understand each other’s moods and intentions would have greatly increased the likelihood of positive interaction.

‘Hunter gatherers at a campsite.’ ( Newton’s Apple ) Note the wolf-dogs waiting near food.

When one stops to think about it, this explanation seems a lot more credible than wolves pleading for scraps. Each side saw the benefits of teamwork. The early human would have picked up hunting strategies from the wolves and would have been greatly aided by the dogs’ keen sense of smell. Some scholars even suggest early wolf-dogs may have served as pack animals. In return, the wolves would have gained a more reliable food supply and increased protection. This was particularly important for the young pups who the adults may have been able to leave in the village while they went off on the hunt. The pups would have played with the human children and increased the fraternal bonds.

Why No Wolf-Dog Images?

It is interesting to note that, among the 400-plus animal images in Chauvet, there are no dogs or wolves. At first glance, this may seem to indicate that the humans did not know of the canine. However, experts believe the absence of wolf images is not because of human ignorance or disregard for the species. If at this point in time (32,000 years ago) the wolf-dogs were helping humans hunt, they “might have been placed in a completely different symbolic category from other animals” (Shipman, 2016).

Polychrome painting of wolf in the Font-de-Gaume cavern.

“What if dogs were put in the ‘human family’ category as an extension of the hunter, and like humans, warranted no (or very few) painted or engraved depictions?” asks Anne PikeTay of Vassar College (Shipman, 2016).

This theory would lend support to another theory about human-canine relations made by researchers at New York Univeristy. Randall White and his team have been examining the ornamentation objects worn by the humans living in France in the Aurignacian period (approximately 32,000 – 26,000 BC.)

  • 2,000-Year-Old Dog Burials in Siberia Reveal Relationship Between Ancient People and Their Pets
  • Not Always A Man’s Best Friend: Terrifying Black Dogs of British Legends
  • Ritual and Burial: The Strange and Elaborate Ways Humans Prepared Animals for the Afterlife

Identification Through Jewelry

In addition to works of art, this era in human development is when the first evidence of jewelry arises. More than just decoration, “people chose to wear objects that displayed their identity or membership in a certain group or clan. Like gang colors or a t-shirt that proclaims its wearer to be a fan of a particular band, ancient people wore things that made their allegiances clear. (Shipman, 2016)

White’s team has determined that Aurignacian humans did not simply wear any tooth they found. At that place and time, the most prevalent animals would have been horses, cattle, and reindeer. “Wolves [were] rare, making up less than 3 percent of the total fauna…However, nearly two thirds of the ornaments are teeth of wolves or foxes. The rest of the perforated teeth are from other rare species: bear, humans and red deer. None of the teeth of the most common species were used as ornaments at Brassempouy [France]” (Shipman, 2016).

Typology of teeth used as personal ornaments in the Aurignacian. ( Journal of Archaeological Science )

The team concludes that ornaments of canine teeth could have been made by humans wishing to designate themselves as part of a clan that worked with wolves. After all, this was “a remarkable human achievement that doubtless provided a definite selective advantage to those who accomplished it successfully. They might well have had reason to brag about their accomplishment by wearing canid teeth.” (Shipman, 2016).


26,000-Year-Old Child Footprints Found Alongside Paw Prints Reveal Oldest Evidence of Human-Canine Relationship

There is little doubt that humans and dogs are naturally inclined to be best friends. But when and how did this dynamic duo first emerge? Conventional wisdom holds that agrarian man domesticated scavenger canines about 15,000 years ago. However, recent archaeological discoveries and DNA analyses show that not only is our friendship closer to 30,000 years old (possibly 40,000 years) but also that man did not master and breed wolves into companionable dogs. Rather, our relationship was built on mutual benefits and respect. This new reality has been made strikingly clear by the discovery of a set of footprints indicating a small child walked alongside a large wolf some 26,000 years ago.

Finding the Prints

The Chauvet Cave in France is renowned as the site of some of the world&rsquos oldest paintings. Over 400 images of animals were created around 32,000 years ago. Yet it is another discovery that has gripped the imagination of canine enthusiasts. In the back of the cave, one can see the ancient footsteps of a small child walking alongside a wolf. Stretching over 150 feet (45.72 meters), the prints were made in soft clay, hardened, and were left undisturbed for thousands of years.


First Dog on Earth by Irv Weinberg

First Dog on Earth by Irv Weinberg | 20 Oct 2020|Weeva Inc.

Set thirty thousand years ago, more or less, Irv Weinberg weaves a tale about Oohma, the first dog, born from a wolf, and pushed out of the pack with his littermates to fend for themselves. The story takes off from an archeological fact, that found in the Chauvet Cave in France along with its remarkable cave art were the fossilized tracks of a boy and a dog, a discovery that pushed the origins of man’s friendship with dogs back about 10 thousand years.1

Oohma and his pack move south away from the wolves and run into a human hunter/gatherer tribe moving north in the expansion from Africa that took place in the Upper Paleolithic (Late Stone Age). The author gives Oohma a lot of credit for reasoning and creative thought, more than he gives Ish, the aged hunter that the dog befriends by leaving him a fresh kill. Ish had been going off alone to hunt, no longer able to keep up with the young hunters of the tribe, and no longer useful by their standards. Being befriended by Oohma suddenly meant that he was able to provide better than anyone, even Hun, the alpha male of the tribe, who winds up getting pushed aside for leadership. Ish doesn’t just get the dog and leadership of the tribe, he gets Lut, the young medicine woman for a mate, and Oohma brings his pack in to join with the tribe.

The story takes two tracks. On one we watch Ish and Lut, often spurred by Oohma as they adopt everything from goat herding, courtesy of Oohma’s gathering wild goats, to growing wheat and baking bread. Some of this is explained by a gnostic experience Lut has when she eats some mushrooms and suddenly becomes aware of a wide range of homeopathic knowledge, some by Baba, a precious member of the tribe, and the artist whose paintings would someday be found by archeologists.

On the other track, Hun, the deposed younger leader finds a new tribe, but one that doesn’t know anything about flint knapping, trapping animals, or throwing spears. Though he tries to teach them they’re pretty hopeless, and what he really wants it to return to his own tribe in glory.

This is supposed to be Oohma’s story, and to some degree it is. Most of the book is from his viewpoint as he watches, nudges, and occasionally drags Ish and the others into modernity. The acts of affection that we associate with modern dogs come pre-wired here, the pleasurable connection between man and dog through touch and companionship, the wolflike cunning tempered by loyalty to a human, and ultimately the price that humans pay for giving their hearts to a dog.

Not as anthropologically astute as Clan of the Cave Bear, Weinberg packs an unreasonable amount of advancement into one dog’s lifespan. In his effort to show how dogs enabled humans to advance he sometimes loses sight of the emotional content of the story but seen through the eyes of a dog it’s not like you can go too far off the trail.

This is a perfect fit for Amazon’s Unlimited, which lets you read it free as part of your membership. It’s engaging, especially for anyone who loves dogs, but it’s not the first book on the subject, and you might consider The Dog Master: A Novel of the First Dog (2015) by W. Bruce Cameron after you read this for a different take on the subject set in much the same period.


26,000-Year-Old Child Footprints Found Alongside Paw Prints Reveal Oldest Evidence of Human-Canine Relationship - History

Thu, 17 Jun 2021 20:10:14 +0000

Sat, 14 Dec 2019 03:26:31 +0000

Thu, 20 Jun 2019 14:06:01 +0000

Sat, 26 Jan 2019 07:04:09 +0000

https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-lion-and-tiger-fight-interaction-in-zoo-circus-or-any-other-captive-places Before you write here, read these rules:
1. No hypothetical vs debate. Strictly neutral observations.
2. Talk only about captive animal in unnatural environment & enclosed habitats. Don't take out conclusion on wild counterparts.
3. Keep in mind that these are captive animals and we don't know the condition or background of individuals

So, lets fill this thread with these type of videos and Images.]]> Before you write here, read these rules:
1. No hypothetical vs debate. Strictly neutral observations.
2. Talk only about captive animal in unnatural environment & enclosed habitats. Don't take out conclusion on wild counterparts.
3. Keep in mind that these are captive animals and we don't know the condition or background of individuals

Wed, 23 Jan 2019 22:56:39 +0000

Nikon D 7100 +Sigma 70-200 mm f 2.8 lens
@ 70 mm , F 4.5 , 1/800, ISO 500 ,
Date 10 AUG 2017
Location : Alathur , Palakkadu, Kerala.
( Full screen view recommended )

Raja preying on domestic bison

Kaziranga Tiger chasing down domestic cattle

Nikon D 7100 +Sigma 70-200 mm f 2.8 lens
@ 70 mm , F 4.5 , 1/800, ISO 500 ,
Date 10 AUG 2017
Location : Alathur , Palakkadu, Kerala.
( Full screen view recommended )

Raja preying on domestic bison

Kaziranga Tiger chasing down domestic cattle

Fri, 21 Dec 2018 11:29:44 +0000

https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-animal-breeds Quote: The dog diverged from a now-extinct population of wolves immediately before the Last Glacial Maximum , when much of Eurasia was a cold, dry mammoth steppe biome.

The closest living relative of the dog is the extant gray wolf , and an extinct Late Pleistocene wolf is the nearest common ancestor to the dog & modern wolf.
The dog and the extant gray wolf are sister taxa , as modern wolves are not closely related to the wolves that were first domesticated to Paleolithic dogs .

A recent study suggests that domestication took place from a single population in during a short time somewhere in Eastern Asia from where they migrated, on which another fascinating research was done.

But it's likely that ancestors of dogs, weaker & docile outcasts from wild packs, may have been following hunter-gatherers for more than 40k years!
There's no reason that feat wasn't replicated elsewhere, penally in smaller scale.

This study on genetic diversity of village dogs over the world, found high quite an amount of genetic differences in local strays, actually more than artificially created "breeds" who were basically inbred to highlight certain desired traits.
Unfortunately, need for those are mostly gone today & these once functional breeds are being turned into abominations.

]]> Quote: The dog diverged from a now-extinct population of wolves immediately before the Last Glacial Maximum , when much of Eurasia was a cold, dry mammoth steppe biome.

The closest living relative of the dog is the extant gray wolf , and an extinct Late Pleistocene wolf is the nearest common ancestor to the dog & modern wolf.
The dog and the extant gray wolf are sister taxa , as modern wolves are not closely related to the wolves that were first domesticated to Paleolithic dogs .

A recent study suggests that domestication took place from a single population in during a short time somewhere in Eastern Asia from where they migrated, on which another fascinating research was done.

But it's likely that ancestors of dogs, weaker & docile outcasts from wild packs, may have been following hunter-gatherers for more than 40k years!
There's no reason that feat wasn't replicated elsewhere, penally in smaller scale.

This study on genetic diversity of village dogs over the world, found high quite an amount of genetic differences in local strays, actually more than artificially created "breeds" who were basically inbred to highlight certain desired traits.
Unfortunately, need for those are mostly gone today & these once functional breeds are being turned into abominations.

Fri, 21 Dec 2018 08:32:51 +0000

Tue, 13 Nov 2018 13:20:15 +0000

https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-oleg-zubhkov-lions-taigan-park Олег Зубков it is his name coz he is Russian and by google translating his name it came Oleg Zubkov ….. I didn’t say one of the best. He is the best.

It is this Russian though it is difficult in general to tame the tiger than lion though they look easily docile, submitting and tamed than lions but Tigers are ones who deceive and mostly attack the tamers and break from captivity. Hence, he raises both animals but uses lions for safari purpose. This Russian does you tube shows on the lions though he is both tiger and lion tamer and People around the world come to his Lions TAIGAN Zoo Safari Park in CRIMEA, IN RUSSIA/UKRAINE -special zoo+safari to touch, selfies and videos feel and hug lions and others may be he earns income by this. He felt it is easy to tame lions to do shows and daily many people come to him and he takes them to safari in his own reserve in Russia and it is not an ordinary safari people go play with them, film them, take selfies do everything with them coz the man is very strict and rude towards animals and his dominance is clearly visible to animals so as long as he is there no lion dare to attack people even they beat them. He is not just a tamer but the controller of the pride and alpha more like Jurassic park blue and the raptor gang. He is the director and owner of that zoo and safari which has a long history.

They do what he says to them. All the captive lions are aside and these some 100+ lions aside coz they grew under him very strictly and dominance and he is their alpha, beta, gamma and everything. they are no less than domestic dogs. They are friendly to him and other daily customers in presence of that guy. These are the tamestishhhhhh lions in the world and he is the best tamer of all time. He also has many leopards, tigers, bears etc. Even he puts Lion man Kevin Richardson and tiger man John Varty etc. like people to shame coz they raised the animals and are friendly like them and didn’t show dominance so they sometimes attack but this guy is unique and unpopular.

They can kill him in seconds but they don’t coz his restrictive behaviour and dominance made them like less than docile domestic dogs coz at least dogs bark at the outsiders but these. nope. no aggression in his presence. if anything looks dangerous he just scolds and curses them/slap them with hand or shoe/slipper/sandal.

Know more about him to get amused.]]> Олег Зубков it is his name coz he is Russian and by google translating his name it came Oleg Zubkov ….. I didn’t say one of the best. He is the best.

It is this Russian though it is difficult in general to tame the tiger than lion though they look easily docile, submitting and tamed than lions but Tigers are ones who deceive and mostly attack the tamers and break from captivity. Hence, he raises both animals but uses lions for safari purpose. This Russian does you tube shows on the lions though he is both tiger and lion tamer and People around the world come to his Lions TAIGAN Zoo Safari Park in CRIMEA, IN RUSSIA/UKRAINE -special zoo+safari to touch, selfies and videos feel and hug lions and others may be he earns income by this. He felt it is easy to tame lions to do shows and daily many people come to him and he takes them to safari in his own reserve in Russia and it is not an ordinary safari people go play with them, film them, take selfies do everything with them coz the man is very strict and rude towards animals and his dominance is clearly visible to animals so as long as he is there no lion dare to attack people even they beat them. He is not just a tamer but the controller of the pride and alpha more like Jurassic park blue and the raptor gang. He is the director and owner of that zoo and safari which has a long history.

They do what he says to them. All the captive lions are aside and these some 100+ lions aside coz they grew under him very strictly and dominance and he is their alpha, beta, gamma and everything. they are no less than domestic dogs. They are friendly to him and other daily customers in presence of that guy. These are the tamestishhhhhh lions in the world and he is the best tamer of all time. He also has many leopards, tigers, bears etc. Even he puts Lion man Kevin Richardson and tiger man John Varty etc. like people to shame coz they raised the animals and are friendly like them and didn’t show dominance so they sometimes attack but this guy is unique and unpopular.

They can kill him in seconds but they don’t coz his restrictive behaviour and dominance made them like less than docile domestic dogs coz at least dogs bark at the outsiders but these. nope. no aggression in his presence. if anything looks dangerous he just scolds and curses them/slap them with hand or shoe/slipper/sandal.


Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos