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Model of Orleans Cathedral [Rear View]

Model of Orleans Cathedral [Rear View]


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The Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) and the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) collections are among the largest and most heavily used in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. Since 2000, documentation from the Historic American Landscapes Survey (HALS) has been added to the holdings. The collections document achievements in architecture, engineering, and landscape design in the United States and its territories through a comprehensive range of building types, engineering technologies, and landscapes, including examples as diverse as the Pueblo of Acoma, houses, windmills, one-room schools, the Golden Gate Bridge, and buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

Administered since 1933 through cooperative agreements with the National Park Service, the Library of Congress, and the private sector, ongoing programs of the National Park Service have recorded America's built environment in multiformat surveys comprising more than 581,000 measured drawings, large-format photographs, and written histories for more than 43,000 historic structures and sites dating from Pre-Columbian times to the twentieth century. This online presentation of the HABS/HAER/HALS collections includes digitized images of measured drawings, black-and-white photographs, color transparencies, photo captions, written history pages, and supplemental materials. Since the National Park Service's HABS, HAER and HALS programs create new documentation each year, documentation will continue to be added to the collections. The first phase of digitization of the Historic American Engineering Record collection was made possible by the generous support of the Shell Oil Company Foundation.


Actress Jayne Mansfield dies in car crash

Blonde bombshell and celebrated actress Jayne Mansfield is killed instantly on June 29, 1967, when the car in which she is riding strikes the rear of a trailer truck on U.S. Route 90 east of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Mansfield had been on her way to New Orleans from Biloxi, Mississippi, where she had been performing a standing engagement at a local nightclub she had a television appearance scheduled the following day. Ronald B. Harrison, a driver for the Gus Stevens Dinner Club, was driving Mansfield and her lawyer and companion, Samuel S. Brody, along with three of Mansfield’s children with her ex-husband Mickey Hargitay, in Stevens’ 1966 Buick Electra. On a dark stretch of road, just as the truck was approaching a machine emitting a thick white fog used to spray mosquitoes (which may have obscured it from Harrison’s view), the Electra hit the trailer-truck from behind. Mansfield, Harrison and Brody were all killed in the accident. Eight-year-old Mickey, six-year-old Zoltan and three-year-old Marie, or Mariska, had apparently been sleeping on the rear seat they were injured but survived.

Born Vera Jayne Palmer in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, Mansfield arrived in Hollywood as a young wife and mother (to daughter Jayne Marie) in 1954, determined to become an actress. From the beginning, she wasn’t afraid to make the most of her assets, particularly her curvaceous figure, flowing platinum blonde hair and dazzling smile. Cast in the Broadway comedy Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?, she turned heads as a voluptuous, dumb blonde movie star in one famous scene she appeared in nothing but a white towel. She famously appeared nude in the 1963 comedy Promises! Promises!, and stills from the set appeared in Playboy magazine, but her best performance was generally believed to have been in 1957’s The Wayward Bus, based on the John Steinbeck novel and costarring Joan Collins. While her screen career amounted to about a dozen less-than-memorable films, off screen she played the movie star role to perfection, and became one of the most visible glamour girls of the era.


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Things To Do

Congo Square, the Whitney Plantation and more - New Orleans is filled with places and spaces perfect for commemorating Juneteenth.

Celebrate Caribbean culture at Curry with a Flavor, enjoy BBQ at Hogs for a Cause and taste top wines at NOWFE, plus Father&rsquos Day, Pride, and more.

Looking to plan the perfect summer getaway? Look no further than the Crescent City. Whether you&rsquore seeking family fun or a girlfriends&rsquo getaway, there&rsquos so much to do this summer.

Eat

2021 is certainly shaping up to be pretty great. We have festivals and live music to look forward to, and our restaurants are back in action. See where we're eating this month.

Ice cream, popsicles and sno-balls-oh my! Here are some of the top spots in town for cooling off with the perfect icy summer treat.

From the Bywater to Uptown and everywhere in between, check out the best restaurants for boozy brunch by neighborhood.

Drink

A frosé, mint julep or Pimm&rsquos Cup can hit all the right notes on a warm summer evening - find our picks for the most refreshing summer cocktails here.

Whether you&rsquore looking for a glass, a flight or a bottle, here are our top spots for wine bars in New Orleans.

From Creole classics to contemporary cuisine and everything in between, there's no such thing as a bad meal in New Orleans. See who is open for dine-in, takeout and delivery.

See which attractions have opened, and learn more about the guidelines for keeping visitors and staff safe.

From where to eat to what to do, find the shops, attractions, hotels, restaurants, and more that are currently open in New Orleans.

Sign up for special tips, offers, and info about all the latest happenings around NOLA with our monthly Insider&rsquos Guide, delivered right to your inbox.


Writing In the Community: The New Orleans Writing Marathon as Model

Summary: This article explores the history and foundations of the New Orleans-style writing marathon. Richard Louth describes what it’s like to lead a writing marathon he provides tips, insights, writing prompts, and writing samples that illustrate how a community can be guided to write together over time and space. This piece is a good introduction for teacher leaders who are thinking about ways to support teachers as writers, often a transformative dimension of a Writing Project experience.

Original Date of Publication: Winter 2002


Café du Monde and the click and clanging of the glasses and silverware. One of the few places where they greet you with a glass of water.”
—Trish Benit, 2001

The sexy yak of a saxophone drifts into the Café du Monde, mixing with the beat of ceiling fans and the smell of hot, powdered beignets. Across the street, two children tap-dance for quarters while a third spins a bicycle wheel on his head, the spokes a gray halo in the humid air. A horse-drawn carriage clops by St. Louis Cathedral while a mime dressed as Uncle Sam freezes in midstride outside the café window. Inside, teachers gingerly sip café au lait, knock excess sugar off their beignets, and stare at the world outside. Despite their good spirits, I see anxiety in their expressions. “What are we doing here?” they seem to ask.

Usually by 10 a.m., members of our Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project (SLWP) summer institute are comfortably enclosed in a room on the other side of the swamps. And we have already finished journal writing, someone has shared the log, and one nervous summer fellow is launching into a ninety-minute teaching demonstration.

But today we are embracing the unfamiliar in our surroundings, and ourselves, through a field trip we call the New Orleans Writing Marathon.

In the Beginning: Natalie Goldberg’s Marathon

Our first writing marathon took place on much more familiar soil in 1992, when one summer institute participant, Melanie Plesh, introduced us to her practice of journaling with students and to Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones. During her teaching demonstration, the other institute participants sat around one table and wrote for hours in response to Melanie’s prompts, which differ significantly from Goldberg’s (see below). Here is Goldberg’s advice about writing during the marathon:

Everyone in the group agrees to commit himself or herself for the full time. Then we make up a schedule. For example, a ten-minute writing session, another ten-minute session, a fifteen-minute session, two twenty-minute sessions, and then we finish with a half-hour round of writing. So for the first session, we all write for ten minutes and then go around the room and read what we’ve written with no comments by anyone. . . . A pause naturally happens after each reader, but we do not say “That was great” or even “I know what you mean.” There is no good or bad, no praise or criticism. We read what we have written and go on to the next person. . . . What usually happens is you stop thinking: you write you become less and less self-conscious. Everyone is in the same boat, and because no comments are made, you feel freer and freer to write anything you want. (150)

This is the theory behind our marathoning, and the first week of every institute, we still “marathon” this way because we value the intensity of the writing experience and the sense of community it produces. But in 1994, we discovered how the marathon could be transformed into a different dish altogether when we added a cup of Louisiana spices to the roux.

The First New Orleans Marathon

The first New Orleans Writing Marathon was not for an institute but for a conference of about a hundred teacher-consultants from across the state. Asked to lead an afternoon of writing activities for the statewide Louisiana Writing Project’s Festival of Writers, I wanted to do a marathon based on our site’s approach but knew that there were too many people to make it work. I knew also that after a morning of workshops, teachers would rather be on the streets of the French Quarter than writing in a hotel conference room, and that they would crave a chance to chat over an oyster po’boy washed down by a Dixie beer at least as much as the opportunity to write. The solution was to form small writing groups and release them to the streets where Faulkner wrote his first novel, Tennessee Williams set A Streetcar Named Desire, and Andrei Codrescu insists The Muse is Always Half-Dressed.

Immediately, there were practical questions. Who should be in each group? Where should each group go? What would convince them to come back? Also, as both the city and the marathon experience were new to most participants, how could they be prepared for each?

Fearing mass confusion, groups too large, individuals left out, and people getting lost, I had collected the names of all participants beforehand and on file cards created groups with designated itineraries. However, at the last minute, instinct told me to have faith in my audience, to scrap these plans, and to ask everyone to determine their own groups and paths. All they received was a simple handout explaining Goldberg’s advice about responding, a map, and a list of restaurants, coffeehouses, and bars. In addition, I recommended that they limit groups to four or five people so as not to disrupt any establishment they entered, that they try to pick a new spot to write each hour, and that they return by 5 p.m. I concluded with three final pieces of advice that I still give to marathoners:

  • If you go into a restaurant or bar, be sure to order something.
  • If anyone asks, tell them you are a writer.
  • Keep in mind that you are doing this for yourself and for nobody else.

Simple enough, but I worried how many would feel offended that their activity hadn’t been more structured and if groups would visit places where they were uncomfortable. How many would be lost to shopping, muggings, or inebriation? Miraculously, everyone returned, and when they did, they were somehow different. An excitement filled the room, a common bond that came from this strange experience. They wanted to read, even though it was time for dinner, or to tell stories of people they’d seen and places they’d been. Some talked of seeing things they had never seen before, while others talked only about another’s writing. A few even went to their rooms to revise so that they could read more polished pieces at breakfast the next day. This, when the pleasures of New Orleans were on the other side of the hotel door.

Institute Marathons

After two successful festival marathons, taking a summer institute on a New Orleans Writing Marathon seemed natural. Because our institute lives an hour from the city, some adjustments had to be made, but over the last six years, the New Orleans Writing Marathon has become a tradition at our site. We arrange car pools the day before and ask everyone to meet at the Café du Monde, a familiar landmark, by 10 a.m. After we assemble, we usually hear the previous day’s log, and then we split into small, usually unplanned, groups. One of the unexpected thrills of the marathon is ending up in unfamiliar places with unfamiliar partners. At the end of the day, groups convene at a pub to touch base and read before beating the rush hour traffic home. Some years, fellows have stayed overnight, dining at Galatoire’s and dancing to zydeco music at Mid City Rock and Bowl. Fellows are encouraged to bring friends and relatives who want to write, and often we are also joined by former fellows, nearby writing projects, or special guests such as Kim Stafford, director of the Oregon Writing Project at Lewis and Clark College who has a special interest in writing about place. In 2001, writers from the Live Oak Writing Project came from Mississippi to join us for their first marathon.

I Am a Writer

How many of us, as teachers, can live the writer’s life? For me, the writing marathon was my first taste of what it would really feel like to be a writer. It was the very first moment I ever thought, ‘Damn, I am a writer.'”
—Beth Calloway, 1996

Before we begin a marathon, I ask each participant to turn to another and say, “I am a writer.” If asked to identify themselves that day, I tell them to reply, “I’m a writer.” Why? Because most summer fellows identify themselves as teachers, not writers, and for a marathon to succeed, participants must think of themselves in a new way. The marathon introduces its participants to an unfamiliar world, and the first step is to forget the familiar identities that often get us through the rest of the year. I have discovered that thinking of yourself as a writer not only affects you but also others, and that it can open many doors. During my second festival marathon, my group crossed the Mississippi River on a ferry and looked for a place to write along the levee, but cold February winds forced us to seek shelter. We approached a restaurant perched on a bend in the river only to have a waiter tell us they were closed. However, when he asked us what we were doing there, and we replied, “We are writers looking for a place to write,” his demeanor suddenly changed. “In that case, come in by the fire,” he said. We wrote that afternoon in overstuffed chairs by a cozy window overlooking the river, sipping hot coffee that he brought us.

This kind of thing happens again and again, and not just in New Orleans. Sherry Swain, director of the Mississippi Writing/Thinking Institute, tells the following story about a group doing a marathon on a Mississippi college campus:

The most interesting story for me came from the group that began by asking a construction crew at the stadium (always the stadium is being spiffed up!) whether they might enter to sit on the fifty-yard line.

“No, I don’t have the authority to let you in,” the foreman said.

But then they said, “WE’RE WRITERS!”

And he said, “Well then, come on in. There’s an open gate around the corner.”

Similar stories abound—marathoners admitted to a private garden in Arkansas, a writing group given a free ride in a Florida trolley, etc. It happens, I think, because writers who believe in themselves tap into an unimaginable power people sense this, and treat them with the kind of reverence often given to priests.

Things Do Go Wrong

There have been times when the marathon has not worked. For instance, at a festival of writers in Lafayette, the marathon turned into a sightseeing tour not enough writing happened. Our group ended up on a tour boat in the stark, beautiful Atchafalaya Basin with a captain whose Cajun patter never gave us a chance to write. Noise also plagued us in New Orleans when, at the end of the 1996 marathon, we gathered in a park by the Mississippi River in order to read and say goodbye only to be interrupted every five minutes by a ship’s shrill whistle and the captain announcing departure. Bad acoustics, bad seating, or other interferences during the marathon are rare, for small groups can usually get up and move. But they can put a damper on the final gathering when groups convene, so it is important to plan ahead. In 1997, the quaint coffeehouse we chose for our final rendezvous let us move chairs and tables, but the acoustics in the building were horrible. Even if the proprietors had turned down the classical background music (which they wouldn’t do), we could not have heard each other read. And waiting thirty minutes for everyone to get caffe lattes made it worse. Because we choose not to “overplan,” we sometimes run into unpleasant surprises however, that is a small price to pay for the good surprises—the sudden insights into oneself, one’s colleagues, and one’s surroundings.

Further, the above difficulties are often prevented with a little luck and planning. We now meet for a drink at an Irish pub, and if the place becomes too loud, we save our readings until we return to the institute. The biggest problem occurs when a participant doesn’t understand the purpose of the marathon and simply views it as a chance to shop, as a day off from the institute, or as a chance to visit with friends. The best way to prevent this happening is to build writing into the culture of the institute beforehand and to review the guidelines about sharing and writing when you begin. The essential thing for everyone to remember is that the marathon is not about sightseeing, sharing, or holding a final reading: it is all about seeing the world as a writer and giving oneself the chance to do this.

The Paths of Writing

Like a marathon’s many paths, its writings are full of surprises. While one group may journey between bar, restaurant, and park, another marathons on a streetcar, as a third spreads its time between patisserie, quiet courtyard, and raucous Bourbon Street. Like the external journeys each group takes, the internal journeys each writer takes are a blend of the familiar and unfamiliar. These examples illustrate the paths a marathon can take. Writing in a coffeehouse, Barry L. Dunlap observes the strange world surrounding him in the French Quarter.

As I slurp my
coffee, she enters
the shop—
white shirt off one
shoulder,
black skirt,
shadowed eyes
she drudges to the rear
of the shop, then
approaches the man
sitting at the window—
interrupts his reading—
murky dreadlocks uncover
his eyes.
She speaks:
“Find me someone who
does witchcraft.”
They leave, different
directions.
—Barry L. Dunlap, 1997

Meanwhile in St. Louis Cathedral, Jeri Stewart uses her more familiar surroundings to journey deep into herself.

Inside the Cathedral

What a beautiful place! Somehow, I do feel lonely here. New Orleans is where my Catholic heritage began. The tour guide is in the back of the church. She is speaking French—just like my mom and Memere used to do. I miss those days, and they seem so far away, almost as if they were for someone else, not for me. Pepere would take us kids to church every Sunday. My mom and Memere would go at 5:00 a.m., and I still have never figured out why they went so early. I used to get so angry with my brother because he used to kick the pew in front of us, and the people would always turn around to see who was doing that. It never seemed to bother Robert. In fact, I think he liked it and almost dared anyone to say anything to him. Perhaps he was kicking because we had to go—rain, hail, sleet, or snow—us and the mailman on a mission: his to deliver the mail ours to deliver our souls!
—Jeri Stewart, 1997

George Dorrill (2001) is engaged in a writing reverie while listening to the jukebox at Molly’s on the Market:

Johnny Cash is singing “I Walk the Line.” I remember the alternative lyrics Roland Smauk taught me: “I keep my pants up with a piece of twine because you’re mine, please pull the twine…

Now the Supremes’ “Stop in the Name of Love”—another all-time favorite—brings back college days vividly. I remember Hap’s, drinking beer, smoking Pall Malls, listening to the Supremes. Maybe the high point of my life …

Henrietta Kirby (1999) reflects less on the scene in front of her and more on the messages of her own body:

Muggy and hot. The sweat is dripping around the nape of my neck as I quickly run into Jax Brewery—not menopause sweat but the sweat that little kids get in the summer. The kind of sweat that rims lips and eyelids. The New Orleans sweat that zaps you—no wonder everyone is so laid back in the Deep South—the sweat. It puddles between my breasts and the base of my spine. It begins to slide down into my buttocks. Not perspiration—just sweat—southern sweat. I can smell the salt in the sweat—not body odor—just the smell of sweat, cleansing sweat—the kind of sweat that makes your clothes itchy. I attempt to unobtrusively pull my bra from my skin to get temporary relief from the sweat. Sweat—New Orleans sweat.

While Tracey Marranto (1999) is drawn into the odors of place and led to a poignant memory:

While waiting for my food in Johnny’s Po-Boys, I naturally begin salivating and thinking of food. Why do certain foods spark memories in us? The muffuletta sandwich that I am eagerly awaiting fondly reminds me of Mom and the sandwich shop. She had this restaurant called New Orleans Po-Boys when I was in fifth or sixth grade. It was in the olde towne section of my childhood location, beautiful Fairhope, Alabama. She would make me this creation every afternoon after I walked to her shop from school. I distinctly recall the smell of the shop as I walked inside. The aroma of fried food, fresh bread, and Italian meat and cheeses filled the tiny eatery. What I remember most is seeing my mother putting her heart and soul into that place. It was so heartbreaking to see her closing down after nearly a year of up-and-down business. The shop was getting too expensive to keep up and not enough patrons. She doesn’t talk about it much, and to this day, she will not make or eat a muffuletta. So my memories of this wonderfully flavor-filled sandwich remain bittersweet. I sure do miss that little place because there my mom was in her element as I have never seen before or since.

Following the Model

In the National Writing Project, the model of “teachers teaching teachers” underpins institute, inservices, and continuity. As long as sites recognize the model, there is room for individual differences. The same could be said of the writing marathon. There are many different forms that a marathon can take as long as it is about “writers writing with writers” and recognizes these essentials: setting, group, and writer.

Setting: While the inspiration behind our writing marathon was a city, almost any landscape will do as long as it is conducive to writing without being distracting. The important thing is for the setting to shake one up a bit—to be unfamiliar—and sometimes that happens not because it is a new place but simply because it is being seen through new eyes, a writer’s eyes. While New York City, Charleston, and Baltimore have all proven ideal locations, writing marathons have also blossomed in the Rocky Mountains, on the Mississippi State University campus, and even in an elementary school in Rhode Island. Setting also considers time, for a marathon is as much about duration as distance covered. Usually it takes at least two or three “rounds” of writing and responding before participants feel the effects, and that takes hours, especially if groups move from spot to spot. The longer the marathon, the better.

Group: The second marathon essential is the writing group. As the primary purpose of the marathon is simply for the writer to write, it seems odd that a group is so important, especially if it is not allowed to respond. However, marathoners report that having a group writing with them frees them up and makes them feel less guilty indulging in their own writing. The group also gives writers a deadline, an audience, and in many cases inspiration. It is common for one’s second piece of writing in a marathon to comment on someone else’s first reading, and that in turn often leads writers in new directions and interesting dialogues. The size of the group and members’ familiarity with each other are relatively unimportant. Most important is the group’s discipline in giving time to writing, avoiding response, and remaining sociable yet focused.

Writer: The greatest essential is the writer. One might say that the task of any writer is to make the familiar new and the new familiar. The marathon helps writers do this through the use of setting and groups, but everything finally depends on the commitment of the individual. If marathoners identify themselves as writers before they begin their journey, then they’re off to the right start. The best way for that to occur, of course, is to establish writing as an integral part of the summer institute. However, a pep talk at the start of the marathon helps. Also, an inspirational piece, such as the short opening chapter of Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, or an excerpt from a previous marathon can set the right tone.

Conclusion

The New Orleans Writing Marathon may have begun in Louisiana, but it has been spreading quickly and is now occurring in over a dozen sites around the country. My last marathon took place in Baltimore during the National Writing Project Annual Meeting in November 2001, and it was even fresher than the first. Let me leave you with a moment in time from my journal that morning, which I hope captures the feeling of what it is like and why I continue to do it:

The Baltimore Writing Marathon has begun. Let it begin. I felt like the Pied Piper leading a group of writers toward the harbor. The same old fear. Will they split up into groups? What if all thirty go to Barnes and Noble and spend their time standing in line? Always that fear. How many will then feel let down? “What a dumb idea . . . I hardly wrote a thing . . . I thought we were really going to do something.” Well, that’s the risk you take, and by the time you get about a page, you no longer worry about it. Like when the plane takes off, as soon as you feel the last bump of the tires on the pavement and it lurches up and the noises change and you say that prayer with your eyes closed, “God bless my mother, my father, Kevin, Carolyn, Henry,” and by the time you say “and Doris” you are above a city looking down, probably like you will be when you are dead. Well, that’s what it’s like leading a writing marathon, and that’s what it’s like when you write. You finally are up in the air, into it, into the airiness and freedom and danger, but you’re no longer praying, worrying—you’re into it, there’s nothing else you can do, what’s gonna happen is gonna happen, and you’re free. That’s the best feeling when you’re finally launched.

References

Codrescu, Andrei. 1993. The Muse is Always Half Dressed in New Orleans and Other Essays. New York: Picador.

Goldberg, Natalie. 1986. Writing Down the Bones. Boston: Shambhala Press.

Hemingway, Ernest. 1964. A Moveable Feast. New York: Scribner’s.

About the Author Richard Louth is the director of the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project.


Model of Orleans Cathedral [Rear View] - History

We have divided our Photo Gallery into five sections for easy viewing of over 400 modular home pictures.

Our One-Story Gallery includes photos of our Ranch, T-Ranch, and Raised Ranch style home designs. Our Cape Cod Gallery includes pictures of our Traditional Cape Cod and T/H Cape Cod style home plans. Our Two-Story Gallery includes photos of our Traditional Two-Story and T/H Two-Story style house designs. Our Home Interiors Gallery includes pictures of Accessible Universal Design, Baths & Utility Rooms, Bedrooms & Offices, Foyers & Stairs, Kitchens & Nooks, and Living Areas, including Dining Rooms, Family Rooms and Great Rooms.

When looking through our gallery of modular home photos for two-story, cape cod, and one story homes, notice which features excite you the most so that we can help you incorporate them into your modular home designs. You might see an exterior elevation that you really like, but then discover that the modular house designs you want don’t capture that look. For example, you may see a steeper roof with several gables and dormers in one of the modular house photos, but the modular home designs you’re looking at don’t exhibit those features. The good news is that we usually can add them to the prefab home designs you’re considering so you don’t have to compromise on the additional space and exterior elegance you seek.

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Please contact us at 413-665-1266 ext. 13 if you would like to discuss the type of modular house designs that will best meet your needs.


A Townhome Thoughtfully Transformed

Betsy Eberle Fifield is no stranger to architecture: the homes she de­signed for her family in New York City, constructed in three stories of airspace atop a historic structure in the Tribeca neighborhood, and in Aspen were so spectacular, they warranted features in Architectural Digest magazine. A Lon­don home was featured in World of Interiors, and another home in Mexico wasn’t publicized internationally, but was a construction project important enough to distract Fifield from her art career, after having shows in galleries in London and Aspen. In late December 2014, an article in the New York Times real estate section highlighting a Greek Revival-style townhouse in New Or­leans caught Fifield’s eye. She lived in Aspen, Colorado, but had been visiting New Orleans since the 1990s. “I’m a music fan,” she said, “and I was fantasiz­ing about getting something in the city. I had started to look a little, but not too seriously.” The townhouse at 810 Esplanade Ave. seemed too good to pass up, though, so Fifield asked local contractor and friend Andy Scott to check it out.

Soon, the two embarked on a business venture to restore the multi-family residence using historic rehab tax credits.

As it happened, this joint venture was a continuation of the building’s life as a rental property going back to the establishment of Esplanade Avenue. In 1832, William Montgomery, a businessman who had served under Andrew Jackson in the Battle of New Orleans, purchased the newly subdivided lots, which a only a handful of decades earlier had been land that had served as part of the city’s colonial fortifications. After securing the lots, Montgomery built pair of com­mon-wall townhouses that are very early examples of the Greek Revival style that was taking off in popularity in New Orleans in the 1830s.

With the property secured, Fifield and Scott began the process of demoli­tion. Five rental units had divided up the property for decades, and many of the home’s original details had been covered or altered. As they peeled away walls and finishes from more recent eras, the clarity of the original design and its remaining features came through. “The project dropped me to my knees,” Fifield said. “I have been humbled by it. It has been a whole different process doing his­toric renovation and preservation as opposed to building whatever you want.”

During the demolition process, “we began to follow the natural architec­tural lines of the building, uncovering beautiful details in the house that had gone unnoticed because it had been occupied by five units for generations,” Fifield said. Graceful curves in the staircase, original to its construction, were uncovered under layers of plaster. Nine fireplaces, most of them still oper­able, were revealed. Plaster medallions and other details languished, but their former glory could still be appreciated. Seeing the townhome’s original beauty uncovered, Fifield was moved to preserve all she could of the structure. “I felt it had to exist in its original architectural form,” she said.

A significant turning point in the process was the discovery of a space that revealed itself only after all interior gutting was complete on the third floor. According to Scott, the attic turned out to be “a real garret” — just the kind of space that an artist like Fifield could use as a studio. She began to feel a con­nection to the house through the restoration process, and soon decided she would turn this nearly 180-year-old townhouse into a home for herself rath­er than returning it to the rental market as originally planned. As the basic concept crystallized, local architect Daniel Zangara of Zangara Partners was brought aboard to help her refine the plan and organize the project scope and objectives. “She challenged all of us at every turn to produce the best building possible,” Zangara said. Included in the project requirements was an overall imperative to maintain the integrity of the original structure while moderniz­ing the systems inside: no ceilings were to be lowered, but the building would be as sustainable and healthy as possible, and all work would be guided by De­partment of the Interior Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties.

This was no small project: the building is 4,965 square feet. In working out the renovation, the original layout was generally adhered to, with a couple of key changes. To fit an elevator into the building, the wall along the side hall was thickened to two feet. According to Scott, this modification was a singular solution to several problems. It provided space for the elevator shaft, mechan­ical closets, and ducts and pipes while also becoming an integrated feature in its own right by creating a vestibule-like passageway between the parlor and the hall. It also cleverly restores symmetry to the rear parlor’s slightly off-center pair of windows.

One other floorplan modification was needed. The original front parlor space, on the second floor, occupied the space behind all three front win­dow bays Fifield and Scott claimed the third bay for a master bath and dress­ing area. This intervention is not as out of character as it may initially seem, however. Cypress Building Conservation conducted a detailed analysis that revealed the presence of a cabinet, essentially a large built-in wardrobe, in the same location, suggesting that the traditional role for this zone of the building was more or less remaining unchanged.

The original service quarter building connects to the main house, and today holds the home’s kitchen. Fifield and Scott decided to locate an oven in the building’s original cooking stove the rest of the kitchen was designed around this detail that melded new technology with historic placement.

Often, ceiling heights are lowered to be able to mask pipes, wires and ducts needed for modern amenities. To Fifield, this wasn’t an option. Keeping ceil­ings at full height required close coordination between all consultants and trades, primarily a willingness on the part of the contractor, HVAC tech and plumber to work cooperatively to come up with creative solutions. For exam­ple, Zangara, the architect, Scott, the contractor, and HVAC technician Raul Mena widened the wall between the front and back parlors to allow a duct to maneuver below the ceiling joist without lowering the ceiling.

Addressing potential moisture within the walls was another special challenge. When Scott pulled away the plaster and stucco to repoint the bricks, he discov­ered the mortar between the brick was so wet and soft, you could smear it with your finger. After the walls were allowed to dry out, the exterior wall was stabi­lized and re-plastered.

To further protect against future saturation issues and ensure appropriate breathability of the exterior masonry walls, Zangara called upon the technical know-how of building envelope consultant George Ferris of Alternative Energy Sources. Given the existing thermal mass of the walls — or their capacity to act as a buffer against heat and cold — and the imperative to appropriately man­age moisture, Ferris recommend a less aggressive approach to insulation. At sun-exposed walls, a radiant barrier was installed to transfer incoming heat, increasing the home’s energy efficiency while also allowing it to “breathe.” At the roofline, instead of spray foam, Ferris recommended a formaldehyde-free, high-density, “cathedral” batt to be used with a layer of radiant barrier and a one-inch air gap between them. Like with the walls, this helps the home with climate control in an energy-efficient way.

A view from the back of the property.

Titan Construction put on the new slate roof, and Kendall Ward Masonry re-tucked pointed and stuccoed the brick. “After the demolition there was signifi­cant degradation of the mortar throughout the house due to moisture. Kendall really saved me,” Fifield said. Inside, work continued as PINTO Electric brought the building into the 21st century with necessary electrical wiring, and PEMBA brought on the luxury — the company hid wires to seamlessly bring state-of-the-art lighting, sound and technology systems into the home.

Once the exterior of the building was secure and interior system place­ments were complete, interior detail work could begin. Plasterer Jeff Poree was brought in to bring the surfaces of the rooms together with a Venetian plaster finish. This plastering technique consists of a pigmented “white” coat over a base coat on gypsum board. The “white,” or finish, coat includes pigmented lime mixed with Plaster of Paris, which is then troweled twice to achieve a lustrous burnished appearance. By reducing the need for paint on the interior, this technique not only provides long-term durability but supports healthy indoor air quality, as well. A team at New Orleans Millwork restored original moldings and millwork inside the home.

Restoring the home’s original doors and windows was another important component of the project. Courtney Williams of Cypress Building Conserva­tion points out that proper window restoration is an inherently “green” prac­tice. A properly restored window with operable shutters keeps out moisture and drafts just as effectively as modern factory-made windows. In terms of the restoration work itself, Williams is adamant that Cypress Building Conserva­tion avoids the chemical bath process known as “dipping” at all costs and in­stead uses a heat gun for paint removal. Because old windows are made from extremely durable, densely grained wood, replacement of sash components is seldom required however, when deteriorated material is found, Cypress Building Conservation opts to stabilize as much of the existing material as possible with Department of the Interior-approved epoxies and resins.

In addition to the restoration of these elements, Cypress Building Conser­vation wrote a social and architectural history of the house that Fifield de­scribed as vital to the home’s accurate restoration.

It could be argued that the courtyard functions as the second heart of the home, pulling together the main house and the service dependency around a serene outdoor space, complete with planters and fountain. The courtyard is also the heart of the home’s geothermal heating and cooling system. Unlike standard split system heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps do not require out­door condensers — which are often noisy and unattractive — but instead rely upon deeply drilled wells. In the French Quarter, drilling such wells can pose a significant challenge, because the spaces are so tight it is rarely possible to get a standard drilling into the courtyard of a property. HVAC contractor Raul Mena, however, had a trick up his sleeve: a custom drill rig of his own design can navigate tight French Quarter spaces, bringing geothermal technology to places never before thought possible.

Inside the building, the geothermal system provides excellent dehumidi­fication and cooling in the summer and equally efficient heating in winter. This is an especially important advantage in an older building because it can compensate for the limitations of a building that cannot be sealed and insu­lated to modern standards. It also translates into more compact ducts and air handlers, all of which allow the historic fabric of the building to take center stage while the technology fades discretely into the background.

“When it’s done, I think this house is going to be something of a model for the preservation of a house while simultaneously updating it for contempo­rary lifestyle,” Fifield said. “It’s quite open, so you can see the historic architec­ture, but it will be lived in in the way modern people live in their homes.” She plans to decorate the space with both classic and contemporary furnishings, but only “sparsely,” so as to let the architecture itself shine.

Fifield used to work in advertising and in cosmetics, and long ago left office life, but is still constantly working, she said. This, her sixth personal architectural project, has been the most challenging she looks forward, when 810 Esplanade Ave. is complete, to hosting friends and family so that they too can share in her love of New Orleans, and her special new home. She also plans to spend plenty of time finding creative inspiration in her garret studio.


Model of Orleans Cathedral [Rear View] - History

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Nave, central and principal part of a Christian church, extending from the entrance (the narthex) to the transepts (transverse aisle crossing the nave in front of the sanctuary in a cruciform church) or, in the absence of transepts, to the chancel (area around the altar). In a basilican church (see basilica), which has side aisles, nave refers only to the central aisle. The nave is that part of a church set apart for the laity, as distinguished from the chancel, choir, and presbytery, which are reserved for the choir and clergy. The separation of the two areas may be effected by screens or parapets, called cancelli. The term nave derives from the Latin navis, meaning “ship,” and it has been suggested that it may have been chosen to designate the main body of the building because the ship had been adopted as a symbol of the church.

The form of the nave was adapted by the early Christian builders from the Roman hall of justice, the basilica. The nave of the early Christian basilica was generally lighted by a row of windows near the ceiling, called the clerestory the main, central space was usually flanked on either side by one or two aisles, as in the Basilica of Old St. Peter’s ( ad 330) and San Paolo Fuori le Mura (380), both in Rome. A flat timber roof characteristically covered the nave until the Romanesque and Gothic eras, when stone vaulting became almost universal in the major churches of northern Europe.

Medieval naves were generally divided into many bays, or compartments, producing the effect of great length by the repetition of forms. The standard medieval division of the nave wall into ground-floor arcade, tribune (a vaulted gallery space over the side aisles), optional triforium arcade (a blind or open arcade between the tribune and clerestory), and clerestory became more flexible during the Renaissance, so that frequently—as in San Lorenzo (Florence 1421–29) by Filippo Brunelleschi—the tribune and triforium are eliminated, and the nave wall is divided only into arcade and clerestory. During the Renaissance, the nave also was divided into fewer compartments, giving a feeling of spaciousness and balanced proportion between the height, length, and width. Extreme, dramatic effects, such as the marked verticality of the Gothic in cathedrals such as Reims (begun c. 1211), gave way to a more rationally designed nave space in which no single directional emphasis or sensation was stressed St. Paul’s Cathedral in London (1675–1711), rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire of 1666, provides a fine example.


Joan’s mission

The crown of France at the time was in dispute between the dauphin Charles (later Charles VII), son and heir of the Valois king Charles VI, and the Lancastrian English king Henry VI. Henry’s armies were in alliance with those of Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy (whose father, John the Fearless, had been assassinated in 1419 by partisans of the dauphin), and were occupying much of the northern part of the kingdom. The apparent hopelessness of the dauphin’s cause at the end of 1427 was increased by the fact that, five years after his father’s death, he still had not been crowned. Reims, the traditional place for the investiture of French kings, was well within the territory held by his enemies. As long as the dauphin remained unconsecrated, the rightfulness of his claim to be king of France was open to challenge.

Joan’s village of Domrémy was on the frontier between the France of the Anglo-Burgundians and that of the dauphin. The villagers had already had to abandon their homes before Burgundian threats. Led by the voices of her saints, Joan traveled in May 1428 from Domrémy to Vaucouleurs, the nearest stronghold still loyal to the dauphin, where she asked the captain of the garrison, Robert de Baudricourt, for permission to join the dauphin. He did not take the 16-year-old and her visions seriously, and she returned home. Joan went to Vaucouleurs again in January 1429. This time her quiet firmness and piety gained her the respect of the people, and the captain, persuaded that she was neither a witch nor feebleminded, allowed her to go to the dauphin at Chinon. She left Vaucouleurs about February 13, dressed in men’s clothes and accompanied by six men-at-arms. Crossing territory held by the enemy, and traveling for 11 days, she reached Chinon.

Joan went at once to the castle of the dauphin Charles, who was initially uncertain whether to receive her. His counselors gave him conflicting advice but two days later he granted her an audience. As a test Charles hid himself among his courtiers, but Joan quickly detected him she told him that she wished to go to battle against the English and that she would have him crowned at Reims. On the dauphin’s orders she was interrogated by ecclesiastical authorities in the presence of Jean, duc d’Alençon, a relative of Charles, who showed himself well-disposed toward her. She was then taken to Poitiers for three weeks, where she was further questioned by eminent theologians who were allied to the dauphin’s cause. These examinations, the record of which has not survived, were occasioned by the ever-present fear of heresy following the end of the Western Schism in 1417. Joan told the ecclesiastics that it was not at Poitiers but at Orléans that she would give proof of her mission and forthwith, on March 22, she dictated letters of defiance to the English. In their report the churchmen suggested that in view of the desperate situation of Orléans, which had been under English siege for months, the dauphin would be well-advised to make use of her.

Joan returned to Chinon. At Tours, during April, the dauphin provided her with a military household of several men Jean d’Aulon became her squire, and she was joined by her brothers Jean and Pierre. She had her standard painted with an image of Christ in Judgment and a banner made bearing the name of Jesus. When the question of a sword was brought up, she declared that it would be found in the church of Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois, and one was in fact discovered there.


27 Long View Dr, Orleans, MA 02653

This Single Family Residence is located at 27 Long View Dr, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 492,352, approximately $412.70 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1980. 27 Long View Dr is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

  • Baths : 1
  • Full Baths : 1
  • 3/4 Baths : --
  • 1/2 Baths : --
  • 1/4 Baths : --
  • Beds : 2
  • Exterior finish : --
  • Fireplace : --
  • Lot size : 20038
  • Neighborhood : Orleans Center
  • Property type : Single Family Residence
  • Year built : 1980
  • Exterior Wall : Wood Siding/shingle
  • Roof : Asphalt Shingle
  • Pool : N

$ 3,146.38

This Single Family Residence is located at 29 Crystal Lake Dr, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 750,177, approximately $391.94 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1959. 29 Crystal Lake Dr is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 172 Tonset Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,024,066, approximately $288.31 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1994. 172 Tonset Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 179 Skaket Beach Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,232,568, approximately $563.33 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1960. 179 Skaket Beach Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 81 Old Duck Hole Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,029,790, approximately $444.07 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1970. 81 Old Duck Hole Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 34 Freedom Trl, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 556,394, approximately $385.05 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1994. 34 Freedom Trl is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 13 S Orleans Rd 44, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 164,406, approximately $469.73 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1959. 13 S Orleans Rd 44 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 66 Lake Dr, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,466,722, approximately $537.06 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1969. 66 Lake Dr is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 16 Woodland Park Ln, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 471,382, approximately $349.17 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1978. 16 Woodland Park Ln is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 150 Tonset Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,821,610, approximately $548.51 per square foot. This property was originally built in 2005. 150 Tonset Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 42 Locust Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 582,364, approximately $590.63 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1960. 42 Locust Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 42 Old Colony Way 18, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 349,164, approximately $239.81 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1971. 42 Old Colony Way 18 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 42 Old Colony Way 15, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 319,272, approximately $272.18 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1971. 42 Old Colony Way 15 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

Location, location, location. Stroll to the Main Street to eat or shop or jump on the bike trail. Hardwood flooring, gas fireplace and Central ac enhance this cozy home. Newer replacement windows and roof. Buyers and/or their agent to verify all info.

Enjoy worry-free living close to all Orleans has to offer in this elegant, 62+ independent living community. Lovely second floor 2 BR/2 bath unit, featuring: a full kitchen with quartz counters and stainless steel appliances, hardwood and tile floors, gas fireplace, crown molding, balcony overlooking entrance, surround sound. Primary bedroom w/private bath & walk-in shower. Monthly fee includes: 24/7 concierge, security, emergency response system, utilities-including gas heat, A/C, cable, electric, water trash removal, repair & maintenance of the unit including major appliances & windows, exterior maintenance, garage parking & interior storage unit. Optional gourmet meals prepared by a private chef & served in the formal dining room or order meals brought to your door. Common areas: kitchen & sunny solarium, where residents enjoy morning coffee, a library, large living room w/fireplace, exercise room & visitor's suite for extra overnight guests. This unit is ready for it's new owner!

Two bedroom, two bath condo at the ever popular Old Colony Village in Orleans. South facing second floor unit has had some updates, has been newly painted and is ready for a new owner. Central A/C, Washer & Dryer in unit, extra storage and exterior balcony. The complex offers a clubhouse, outdoor pool. and is adjacent to the bike trail. Convenient to everything in Orleans including the farmers market, the Hot Chocolate Sparrow, shopping, exciting new dining options and local beaches.

This home is located at 11 Lowell Drive Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 27 May 2021 and is currently priced at $499,000, approximately $480 per square foot. This property was built in 1987. 11 Lowell Drive is within the school district(s) Orleans and Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/3936-main-st-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014457285/">3936 Main St</a>, <a href="/property/11-lowell-dr-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014543869/">11 Lowell Dr</a>, 6 Scotch Pine Farm, 87 Ma-6a C1, <a href="/property/25-jasper-moore-trl-harwich-ma-02645/id-500014521112/">25 Jasper Moore Trl</a>, 4 Scotch Pine Farm, <a href="/property/46-nanumet-dr-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014457513/">46 Nanumet Dr</a>, 4 Scotch Pine Farm, <a href="/property/30-quail-nest-run-harwich-ma-02645/id-500014519255/">30 Quail Nest Run</a>, and <a href="/property/94-thousand-oaks-dr-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014459421/">94 Thousand Oaks Dr</a>.

This home is located at 36 Old Colony Way 10 Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 20 May 2021 and is currently priced at $299,000, approximately $255 per square foot. This property was built in 1971. 36 Old Colony Way 10 is within the school district(s) Orleans and Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/36-old-colony-way-14-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541804/">36 Old Colony Way 14</a>, <a href="/property/36-old-colony-way-10-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541800/">36 Old Colony Way 10</a>, 3 Apple Way, and <a href="/property/orleans-ma-02653/id-1000082958949/">54 Old Colony Way</a>.

Beautiful and stylish condo with private 820 square foot garden area located in the heart of Orleans on Cape Cod, has been meticulously renovated as of 2021. With attention to the utmost detail, you will not find a better place to call home. The light filled eat in kitchen has sparkling quartz countertops and beautiful gray cabinetry, new stainless appliances, and luxurious crystal chandeliers. Finishing touches include crystal doorknobs and fabulous French doors that open to your own private courtyard. Offering 948 square feet, 2 good size bedrooms, 1 spacious full bath with pedestal sink and walk in shower, comfortable and bright sun-drenched living room with stained glass windows, more French doors and custom built-in shelving. This wonderful condo has everything you could want, including space for stackable washer/dryer, ample storage, gas heat and air conditioning. Pets are allowed and all this in the heart of Downtown Orleans within striking distance to shopping, dining, the bike path, Cape Cod Baseball and just moments to desirable ocean beaches.

This is a must-see! This centrally located Landings Edge townhouse is close to many restaurants, shopping, Skaket Beach, local favorite Nauset Beach and much more. Features include a generous fireplaced living room, hardwood floors, kitchen with granite counters, tiled floor and a private rear deck to catch the morning sun. Updated bathrooms, wood flooring, and new Harvey windows. Recently renovated to include a bonus living/sleeping area with a new half bath!

This home is located at 73 Old Colony Way 4e Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 13 May 2021 and is currently priced at $275,000, approximately $347 per square foot. This property was built in 1984.

This home is located at 73 Rowland Drive 4 Drive North Chatham, MA 02650 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 17 June 2021 and is currently priced at $470,000, approximately $192 per square foot. This property was built in 2017. 73 Rowland Drive 4 Drive is within the school district(s) Monomoy Regional School District with nearby schools including Chatham Elementary School, Monomoy Regional Middle School, and Monomoy Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are 73 Rowland Dr, <a href="/property/207-sam-ryder-rd-chatham-ma-02633/id-500014466864/">207 Sam Ryder Rd</a>, <a href="/property/chatham-ma-02633/id-500014467005/">4 Nickerson Ln</a>, <a href="/property/912-main-st-310-chatham-ma-02633/id-500014469873/">912 Main St 310</a>, <a href="/property/77-holly-dr-south-chatham-ma-02659/id-500014465955/">77 Holly Dr</a>, 4 Scotch Pine Farm, <a href="/property/247-morton-rd-south-chatham-ma-02659/id-500014465932/">247 Morton Rd</a>, <a href="/property/202-northgate-rd-north-chatham-ma-02650/id-500014469123/">202 Northgate Rd</a>, <a href="/property/chatham-ma-02633/id-500014466667/">88 Soundview Ave</a>, and 912 Main St.

This home is located at 18 Appleby Road West Yarmouth, MA 02673 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 16 June 2021 and is currently priced at $375,000, approximately $318 per square foot. This property was built in 1984. 18 Appleby Road is within the school district(s) Dennis-yarmouth with nearby schools including Marguerite E Small Elementary School and Dennis-yarmouth Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/25-mockingbird-ln-west-yarmouth-ma-02673/id-500014571006/">25 Mockingbird Ln</a>, <a href="/property/23-venus-rd-south-yarmouth-ma-02664/id-500014569116/">23 Venus Rd</a>, <a href="/property/west-dennis-ma-02670/id-500014475028/">7 Scott Ocean View Dr</a>, <a href="/property/18-appleby-rd-west-yarmouth-ma-02673/id-500014565291/">18 Appleby Rd</a>, <a href="/property/south-yarmouth-ma-02664/id-500014573258/">111 Beacon St</a>, <a href="/property/89-lewis-bay-rd-312-hyannis-ma-02601/id-500025018250/">89 Lewis Bay Rd 312</a>, 59 Pond St, <a href="/property/30-mockingbird-ln-west-yarmouth-ma-02673/id-500014571011/">30 Mockingbird Ln</a>, <a href="/property/69-s-sea-ave-west-yarmouth-ma-02673/id-500014563192/">69 S Sea Ave</a>, and <a href="/property/35-briar-cir-south-yarmouth-ma-02664/id-500014563958/">35 Briar Cir</a>.

As a homebuyer, there are quite a few financing options to consider. Our interactive guide can help find which is right for you, and guide you through the paperwork.


18 Priscilla Rd, Orleans, MA 02653

This Single Family Residence is located at 18 Priscilla Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,284,159, approximately $1,146.57 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1935. 18 Priscilla Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

  • Baths : 2
  • Full Baths : 2
  • 3/4 Baths : --
  • 1/2 Baths : --
  • 1/4 Baths : --
  • Beds : 3
  • Exterior finish : --
  • Fireplace : --
  • Lot size : 14810
  • Neighborhood : East Orleans
  • Property type : Single Family Residence
  • Year built : 1935
  • Exterior Wall : Wood Siding/shingle
  • Roof : Asphalt Shingle
  • Pool : N

$ 8,206.43

This Single Family Residence is located at 29 Crystal Lake Dr, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 750,177, approximately $391.94 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1959. 29 Crystal Lake Dr is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 172 Tonset Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,024,066, approximately $288.31 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1994. 172 Tonset Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 179 Skaket Beach Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,232,568, approximately $563.33 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1960. 179 Skaket Beach Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 81 Old Duck Hole Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,029,790, approximately $444.07 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1970. 81 Old Duck Hole Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 34 Freedom Trl, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 556,394, approximately $385.05 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1994. 34 Freedom Trl is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 13 S Orleans Rd 44, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 164,406, approximately $469.73 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1959. 13 S Orleans Rd 44 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 66 Lake Dr, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,466,722, approximately $537.06 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1969. 66 Lake Dr is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 16 Woodland Park Ln, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 471,382, approximately $349.17 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1978. 16 Woodland Park Ln is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 150 Tonset Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 1,821,610, approximately $548.51 per square foot. This property was originally built in 2005. 150 Tonset Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Single Family Residence is located at 42 Locust Rd, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 582,364, approximately $590.63 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1960. 42 Locust Rd is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 42 Old Colony Way 18, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 349,164, approximately $239.81 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1971. 42 Old Colony Way 18 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This Condominium is located at 42 Old Colony Way 15, Orleans, MA. The estimated value of this home is currently priced at 319,272, approximately $272.18 per square foot. This property was originally built in 1971. 42 Old Colony Way 15 is within the school district Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School.

This home is located at 72 Nickerson Road Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 17 June 2021 and is currently priced at $675,000, approximately $361 per square foot. This property was built in 1967. 72 Nickerson Road is within the school district(s) Orleans and Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/1040-state-hwy-eastham-ma-02642/id-500014491431/">1040 State Hwy</a>, <a href="/property/112-timberlane-dr-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014459750/">112 Timberlane Dr</a>, <a href="/property/33-clayton-cir-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014542451/">33 Clayton Cir</a>, <a href="/property/250-mary-chase-rd-eastham-ma-02642/id-500014491480/">250 Mary Chase Rd</a>, <a href="/property/94-thousand-oaks-dr-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014459421/">94 Thousand Oaks Dr</a>, <a href="/property/3936-main-st-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014457285/">3936 Main St</a>, <a href="/property/eastham-ma-02642/id-500014491550/">235 Pine Woods Rd</a>, <a href="/property/34-john-kenrick-rd-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014543760/">34 John Kenrick Rd</a>, <a href="/property/330-hay-rd-eastham-ma-02642/id-500014491691/">330 Hay Rd</a>, and 147 Ma-6a.

Constructed in 2005 by Reef Builders, this Five Star Energy Efficient home with solar panels and propane gas heat offers easy living and a fabulous in-town location. Spacious open plan great room with fire place, cathedral ceilings and hardwood floors flows into the beautiful oak kitchen and dining room with sliders to the rear yard with low maintenance Trex deck, outdoor shower and shade providing pergola. Ground floor bedroom, laundry and one car garage enable first floor living. Second story bedrooms, one with bonus office plus shared full bath provide ample additional sleeping space. Proximity to town playground, tennis and baseball games add to the possibilities this property offers!

Beautiful 3 bedroom Cape home with welcoming front porch overlooking stunning grounds in sought after East Orleans neighborhood. This home offers a lovely sun-filled kitchen with cathedral ceilings, beams, and stainless-steel appliances. Front to back living/dining area with hardwood floors, fireplace, and french doors leading out to the front porch. The first floor also offering a sitting room with an additional fireplace and built-ins, a private en-suite with a walk-in closest, mudroom area, and half bath with laundry. Second floor with 2 spacious bedrooms and full bath. Two cars detached garage, gorgeous perennials outdoor shower and irrigation. Move right in!

This home is located at 27 Freeman Lane Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 25 May 2021 and is currently priced at $895,000, approximately $518 per square foot. This property was built in 1973. 27 Freeman Lane is within the school district(s) Orleans and Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/27-freeman-ln-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014539976/">27 Freeman Ln</a>, <a href="/property/82-main-st-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541892/">82 Main St</a>, <a href="/property/11-center-pl-f-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541943/">11 Center Pl F</a>, <a href="/property/144-bakers-pond-rd-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014543457/">144 Bakers Pond Rd</a>, 147 Ma-6a, <a href="/property/25-windy-bay-rd-eastham-ma-02642/id-500014489418/">25 Windy Bay Rd</a>, <a href="/property/220-locust-rd-eastham-ma-02642/id-500014489773/">220 Locust Rd</a>, and <a href="/property/11-gull-ln-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014540888/">11 Gull Ln</a>.

Four bedroom home on over an acre of land located minutes from Nickerson State Park and Bakers Pond! This home boasts a large master suite on the first floor and large bedrooms. Private backyard with a deck and front patio!

Set back from a quiet cul-de-sac and situated on almost an acre of land, this classic reproduction half cape is as charming as it gets. Serene surroundings abound with specimen trees, gardens, wooded land and bird watching galore! Neighboring 80 acres of conservation augments the quiet serenity. Easy living with classic details make it feel as if you are going back to simpler times while still enjoying the modern comforts. Gorgeous wide pine flooring throughout and two wood burning fireplaces add to the charm. Open floor plan, including a living/dining combo and additional living room allows for flexible entertaining and use of space. Relax on the lovely, screened porch or head outside to the patio for your morning coffee First floor master with lots of storage and a full bath complete the first floor. Upstairs you will find two additional bedrooms and a full bath. All this and a 2 car garage to store your bikes, gear for the beach or a kayak or two.

East Orleans WaterView - This 3 bedroom, 2 bath residence offers fabulous views of Town Cove. The upper floor offers an open floor plan along with the primary bedroom and wrap-around deck for relaxing and entertaining. The lower level offers 2 generous-sized bedrooms and a full bath. This residence shows to have been well maintained. Located in a well established classic Cape Cod neighborhood. Asa's Landing is a short distance away. The setting offers a private backyard with a detached shed for that extra storage. This location justifies value for renovations or upgrades in the future. We have developer estimated upgrades and proposed layout, including pool and 2 car garage and estimated cost.

This home is located at 96 Skaket Beach Road Orleans, MA 02653 US and has been listed on Homes.com since 2 April 2021 and is currently priced at $1,075,000, approximately $412 per square foot. This property was built in 1965. 96 Skaket Beach Road is within the school district(s) Orleans and Nauset with nearby schools including Orleans Elementary School, Nauset Regional Middle School, and Nauset Regional High School. Similar properties nearby are <a href="/property/96-skaket-beach-rd-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014540892/">96 Skaket Beach Rd</a>, <a href="/property/29-partridge-cir-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014454269/">29 Partridge Cir</a>, <a href="/property/15-dale-ann-dr-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014543236/">15 Dale Ann Dr</a>, <a href="/property/11-center-pl-f-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541943/">11 Center Pl F</a>, <a href="/property/82-main-st-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014541892/">82 Main St</a>, <a href="/property/27-freeman-ln-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014539976/">27 Freeman Ln</a>, <a href="/property/55-spruce-run-dr-brewster-ma-02631/id-500014457812/">55 Spruce Run Dr</a>, <a href="/property/124-barley-neck-rd-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014543157/">124 Barley Neck Rd</a>, and <a href="/property/207-brick-hill-rd-orleans-ma-02653/id-500014540137/">207 Brick Hill Rd</a>.

MAYFLOWER POINT-130 Areys Lane-on PILGRIM LAKE in Orleans, WATERFRONT with private access to the lake from the back yard and WATERVIEWS . this beautiful updated four bedroom/3 full bath has plenty of space for family and friends on 1.3 acres with 50' waterfront on Pilgrim Lake with deeded access from backyard to private path to the shore for swimming and boating. And through the exclusive membership in Mayflower Point Association, three saltwater access points are available To the east, north and south, is the Namequoit River and to the west are three small ponds: Areys Pond, Pilgrim Lake, and Kescayo Gansett Pond and boat mooring opportunities may be available. An amazing rental history, this home is being sold turnkey. vrbo#1060550 Rental leases through September must be honored. Worth the wait! Updated kitchen and baths, new roof and furnace and is air-conditioned. Front of home freshly painted. All you have to do is start ''living that Cape Cod Life''!

Mayflower Point- Orleans with freshwater and saltwater access with potential mooring. Private 1.4 acre setting within a short distance to both salt and fresh water association access.

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